Posts Tagged ‘book review’


<a href=”https://www.amazon.com/What-Do-You-Idea/dp/1938298071/ref=as_li_ss_il?ie=UTF8&qid=1507646434&sr=8-1&keywords=what+do+you+do+with+an+idea&linkCode=li2&tag=a038e1a2-20&linkId=95977e0caec8d4bef303de6af3e16631&#8243; target=”_blank”><img border=”0″ src=”//ws-na.amazon-adsystem.com/widgets/q?_encoding=UTF8&ASIN=1938298071&Format=_SL160_&ID=AsinImage&MarketPlace=US&ServiceVersion=20070822&WS=1&tag=a038e1a2-20″ ></a><img src=”https://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=a038e1a2-20&l=li2&o=1&a=1938298071&#8243; width=”1″ height=”1″ border=”0″ alt=”” style=”border:none !important; margin:0px !important;” />Okay, okay, okay, I know this is children’s book, so why do I love it so much. I’ll tell you why. Because it’s brilliant and it’s a wonderful representation of a drum I have been beating for 20 years. I first found this book in a gift shop while I was on vacation this past summer. I read it standing by the shelf (not that hard it’s a children’s book, after all) and had tears in my eyes when I was done.

It’s about a little child and his anthropomorphized idea. It shares all the struggles we have with our ideas, the pain of rejection and the joy we feel when we immerse ourselves in bringing our ideas to life. What do you do with an idea? Well that would be a spoiler, but suffice it to say, it’s what I have been saying all along. I loved this book. Author Kobi Yamada did a great job of bringing this concept to its essence so that anyone can understand it and illustrator Mae Besom captures the spirit of this book fantastically.

Lastly I love that this book was written for children, but the truth is children don’t need it. Children already dream and create. The real and lasting impact of this book will be fond in two ways. First that the children will hold onto it when the world begins to tell them they are too old to dream, and second that people reading this book to their children,grandchildren etc. will grasp the concept and begin to feed their ideas again.

I have so much more to say, but by now my review is probably longer than the book so I will end with three words, read this book!

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John MacArthur is one of those writers that just provokes thought. In this amazing book, MacArthur directs the last day of Jesus’ earthly life and it’s a brilliant work. He gives so much background information that the story just seems to jump off the page. I will refrain from saying MacArthur brings the Scripture to life, because the Scripture is already alive and life giving, but he really helps his reader to understand better the most important event in the most important life in human history.

This book is a must-read for anyone who wants to better understand what Christ did on the cross. I recommend this book to everyone. It is just that good.


This is the kind of book that will make a grown man cry. How do I know? Because I’m a grown man another were quite a few times when the tears came. This is an excellent memoir about what happens when a person really sees someone else and doesn’t walk on by. Jim Bradford was in a little fast food restaurant getting a cup of coffee, when he saw a young boy sitting by himself listening to the radio. He had braces on his legs, from cerebral palsy and was blind. Jim approached the boy and an amazing friendship was born. Together the unlikely pair had amazing adventures that expanded each of their worlds.

This is the kind of book I love. It shows that sometimes if you want to see a miracle, you’ve got to take the time to be the miracle. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and pray that the lessons I learned from it will change my life and the lives of everyone who takes the time to read it. You really can make difference in this world. Jim Bradford and H.K. Derryberry both prove it. This one is a must read.


I thoroughly enjoyed this book. In it Jenkins goes back and forth between a first century Jerusalem and modern day life to craft a pretty cohesive thriller. We start in a Roman prison. The Apostle Paul is in his last imprisonment before his impending death. Luke is going back and forth between helping him and treating victims of a great fire in Rome, a fire ostensibly started by the Emperor Nero but blamed on the Christians as a way to crush the movement. Paul is requesting his parchments, which contain his memoir, his life story. In modern day, seminary professor Augie Knox gets pulled into a case of intrigue trying to find that memoir, which was stolen during an archaeological dig.

The juxtaposition of chapters is part of what makes this a great story. There are two concurrent storylines that each keep those pages turning. The Pauline memoir is fleshed out scripture which while taking liberties to fill in the story do not seem to take away from the biblical narrative. If I had one complaint about this book, and it is a small one, I would have liked to see the final struggle in the modern day storyline expanded upon a bit more. The conclusion comes a little too easily, but again that is a small complaint, and over all I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Jenkins leaves the story a little open ended, leaving the possibility of a sequel on the table. That is a book I would love to read.


I read this Bible Study Book as part of my year-long study on the book of Acts. I’ve been reading a commentary by a Pentecostal Missiologist, a great book that told the book as a story set in our modern day and now this book by one of the great (decidedly, and contrastingly not pentecostal) Bible teachers of our day, John MacArthur. The diversity of these views has allowed me to see the book from a lot of different angles, which has been really helpful. I enjoyed this little book thoroughly. It divides the book of Acts into sections and after giving an overview of the section, plunges right into the text itself, giving insights as you read along. These insights are really helpful. Each chapter also has some really thought provoking questions at the end. My only regret with my purchase of this book was that I bought the Kindle version, making it a little clunky to answer the study-guide questions. I have no doubt I will return to this book for more intensive study before my “year of Acts” is out.


I am doing a study on the book of Acts and using what I am learning for a year of Bible Studies at my church and it has been eye opening. In the process of this study, I am always looking for supplemental materials to help my teaching. It was in this search that I stumbled upon Into the Fray. What a great book. Author Matt Mikalatos is a missionary and it is clear he is passionate about this book.

His approach is unique. He attempts (quite successfully) to bring the stories from Acts to the twenty-first century, as if they were happening right now. This really brings a fresh perspective on the text. It is clear, he is a great story teller. He manages to bring the text to the modern day without sacrificing truth or meaning. He doesn’t just tell the story, through a unique layout technique, he “brackets” the story and then tells the story behind the story, explaining what was happening from the Bible itself. These teachings are theologically sound and very biblical.

I think my favorite chapter is The Storytellers. In this chapter Mikalatos shows Luke telling his story, of how the physician becomes a disciple. It’s a departure from the rest of the book but it sets up a wonderful explanation on how to tell your story, i.e. share your testimony. This chapter is pure gold for all those nervous evangelists who want to share their faith but aren’t quite sure how. This chapter has made me reexamine how I share my own story and the other things I do in my presentations with AMOKArts.

At the end of the book, Mikalatos adds a really nice study guide with questions from each chapter, making Into the Fray a great tool for use in a Bible study on the book of Acts. As a resource, Into the Fray would work well from middle school ministry through adult.

If I had any complaint about this book it’s that it’s too short. I would love to see him recreate this book almost in commentary style telling all the stories rather than just the highlights. This takes away nothing from the excellence of this book. Rather it is a suggestion for another project for Mr. Mikalatos. I really loved this book.


One of the perks of being a blogger is sometimes people send you free books to review. That was the case with this book. When I saw the topic, I knew I had to check it out. As a pastor, this is one of the hardest things to explain to people. We tend treat God like all the human people we have had in our lives. While we are created in God’s image, we have to remember He is perfect and we are not. I bring this up because one of the objections people seem to have to coming to faith is it seems to be that it’s too easy. Kuhn does a masterful job of laying this out. He finds 52 different things that become true of us when we receive Christ. Using engaging stories, biblical, personal and even a few pop culture examples, He lays out all the things God has done for us through Jesus. Each chapter is short and to the point and this book is really well written and from the heart.

This would be a great book to give to a new believer or someone who is on the fence. It would also be great for someone who is struggling with knowing or believing they’re forgiven or wrestling with the meaning of grace in their life. My lone recommendation that might be seen as slightly contrary is that you read the book before you give it away, to make sure it lines up with your doctrine. I found the book to be solid in the vast majority of Kuhn’s points, but his wording on a few of the chapters might require a little explanation, especially to a new believer. No book on this topic will ever be perfect, (except the Bible) but this one comes pretty close. Kuhn goes out of his way to craft a book that is helpful and extremely encouraging. I could see this book being used well as a daily devotional, but I found it so engaging that I read it in about three days. He’s done a good job here.

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